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Archive for June 2010

A Collection of Studies on the Future of Media

Posted June 17th, 2010 by Christopher Clark - Special Assistant to the Future of Media project

Below is a list of recent, relevant research and studies conducted both by the FCC and by a variety of outside groups (a list that we are regularly supplementing).  To the extent that they contain recommendations, which are the most meritorious?  Which are the most troubling?   What other subject areas should be studied and/or additional data collected?  Are there other completed studies that should be added to the list and considered?  

 

 AJR Staff. (2009). “AJR’s 2009 Count of Statehouse Reporters,” American Journalism Review, Apr./May. Available at http://www.ajr.org/article.asp?id=4722

Albertson, Bethany, & Lawrence, Adria (2009, March). After the Credits Roll: The Long-Term Effects of Educational Television on Public Knowledge and Attitudes. American Politics Research, 37(2), 275-300. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1532673X08328600.

 

 Alliance for Better Campaigns, Benton Foundation, Center for Creative Voices in Media, Center for Digital Democracy, Common Cause, Media Access Project, et. al (2004, Apr. 7). Public Interest Obligations and the Digital Television Age (Proposed Guidelines). Available at http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=6516886561.
 

American Library Association. (2009, Apr.). The State of America’s Libraries, A Report from the American Library Association. Available at http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/mediapresscenter/presskits/2009stateofamericaslibraries/State%20draft_04.10.09.pdf.
 
American Society of News Editors. (2009, Apr. 16). U.S. Newsroom Employment Declines. Available at http://asne.org/article_view/smid/370/articleid/12/reftab/101.aspx.
 
American University Center for Social Media. (2009, Sept.). Scan and Analysis of Best Practices in Digital Journalism In and Outside U.S. Public Broadcasting. Available at http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/resources/publications/CPB_journalism_scan/.
 
Anderson, Brian C., & Thierer, Adam D. (2008, September). A Manifesto for Media Freedom. Manhattan Institute. Available at  http://www.manhattan-institute.org/manifesto_for_media_freedom/.
 
ARAnet. (2009, Sept. 24). Survey: Americans Increase Use of Online and Radio News Sources; Hispanics Increasingly Turning to Online News Sources. Available at http://aranetonline.com/Docs/MediaUsageCredibilitySurvey_092409.pdf.
 
Aufderheide, Pat, & Clark, Jessica (2009, Feb.). Public Media 2.0: Dynamic, Engaged Publics (A Future of Public Media Project). American University Center for Social Media. Available at http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/resources/publications/public_media_2_0_dynamic_engaged_publics/.
 
Baumann, Michael G. (2006, Oct.). “Review of the Increases in Non-Entertainment Programming Provided in Markets with Newspaper Owned Television Stations”: An Update(submitted by Media General, Inc. to the FCC’s 2006 Quadrennial Review of Media Ownership Rules – MB Docket No. 06-121). Available at http://webapp01.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=6518534505 (p. 145).
 
Berkowitz, Dan (2007, Oct.). Professional views, community news: Investigative reporting in small US dailies. Journalism, 8(5), 551-558. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1464884907081051.
 
Borrell, Gordon (2009, Aug. 6). The Rumors of Newspapers' Death (Borrell Associates Report). Available at http://www.borrellassociates.com/wordpress/2009/08/06/the-rumors-of-newspapers-death/.
 
Bystrom, Dianne G., & Dimitrova, Daniela V. (2007, Mar.). Rocking the Youth Vote:  How Television Covered Young Voters and Issues in a 2004 Target State. American Behavioral Scientist, 50(9), 1124-1136. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0002764207299363.


 

Champlin, Dell, & Knoedler, Janet (2002). Operating in the Public Interest or in Pursuit of Private Profits? News in the Age of Media Consolidation. Journal of Economic Issues, 36(2). Available at http://diglib.lib.utk.edu/utj/jei/36/jei-36-2-24.pdf.
 
Chipty, Tasneem (2007, June 24). Station Ownership and Programming in Radio (Media Ownership Research Study 5). Available at http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-07-3470A6.pdf. (Study commissioned by FCC for FCC’s 2006 Quadrennial Review of Media Ownership Rules.)
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Posted in Ideas and Debates Research and Studies
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From the Public Comments: Should the FCC Lift Restrictions on Underwriting for Religious Broadcasters?

Posted June 11th, 2010 by Andrew Kaplan - Special Assistant to the Future of Media project

The National Religious Broadcasters (NRB) recently wrote in their public comment [filed February 18, 2010] that while they generally are skeptical of government involvement in media, there are two practical policies in which the FCC could “fertilize” the conditions surrounding the media without actually subsidizing it.
 
The NRB first proposes that the FCC to change its rule and allow fundraising for “third party, non-profit charities by non-commercial broadcast stations.” Currently, noncommercial stations are prohibited from substantially altering or suspending regular programming to fundraise for any entity other than itself. The NRB suggests permitting “NCE licensees to alter or suspend up to 1% of its annual broadcasting time for the purpose of raising funds for third-party, non-profit organizations recognized under section 50 I 1(3) of the I.R.S. code.”
 
Secondly, NRB urges the Commission to lift restrictions on programming sponsorships and underwriting for NCE stations that do not receive federal money, thus allowing more competition with stations affiliated with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
 
The NRB notes that F.C.C. rules “permit sponsorship content that merely ‘identifies’ the
sponsor in a given broadcast spot, but prohibits any that ‘promotes’ a sponsor.” NRB seeks a new rule “which makes sponsorship and underwriting regulations more flexible, provided that it would not substantially alter the non-commercial nature of NCE licensees nor cause them to morph into a commercial model.”
 
Do you agree with these suggestions made? Why or why not?

Posted in Public Notices Noncommercial and Public Media
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