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Research and Studies Category

A Collection of Studies on the Future of Media

Posted June 17th, 2010 by Christopher Clark - Special Assistant to the Future of Media project

Below is a list of recent, relevant research and studies conducted both by the FCC and by a variety of outside groups (a list that we are regularly supplementing).  To the extent that they contain recommendations, which are the most meritorious?  Which are the most troubling?   What other subject areas should be studied and/or additional data collected?  Are there other completed studies that should be added to the list and considered?  

 

 AJR Staff. (2009). “AJR’s 2009 Count of Statehouse Reporters,” American Journalism Review, Apr./May. Available at http://www.ajr.org/article.asp?id=4722

Albertson, Bethany, & Lawrence, Adria (2009, March). After the Credits Roll: The Long-Term Effects of Educational Television on Public Knowledge and Attitudes. American Politics Research, 37(2), 275-300. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1532673X08328600.

 

 Alliance for Better Campaigns, Benton Foundation, Center for Creative Voices in Media, Center for Digital Democracy, Common Cause, Media Access Project, et. al (2004, Apr. 7). Public Interest Obligations and the Digital Television Age (Proposed Guidelines). Available at http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=6516886561.
 

American Library Association. (2009, Apr.). The State of America’s Libraries, A Report from the American Library Association. Available at http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/mediapresscenter/presskits/2009stateofamericaslibraries/State%20draft_04.10.09.pdf.
 
American Society of News Editors. (2009, Apr. 16). U.S. Newsroom Employment Declines. Available at http://asne.org/article_view/smid/370/articleid/12/reftab/101.aspx.
 
American University Center for Social Media. (2009, Sept.). Scan and Analysis of Best Practices in Digital Journalism In and Outside U.S. Public Broadcasting. Available at http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/resources/publications/CPB_journalism_scan/.
 
Anderson, Brian C., & Thierer, Adam D. (2008, September). A Manifesto for Media Freedom. Manhattan Institute. Available at  http://www.manhattan-institute.org/manifesto_for_media_freedom/.
 
ARAnet. (2009, Sept. 24). Survey: Americans Increase Use of Online and Radio News Sources; Hispanics Increasingly Turning to Online News Sources. Available at http://aranetonline.com/Docs/MediaUsageCredibilitySurvey_092409.pdf.
 
Aufderheide, Pat, & Clark, Jessica (2009, Feb.). Public Media 2.0: Dynamic, Engaged Publics (A Future of Public Media Project). American University Center for Social Media. Available at http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/resources/publications/public_media_2_0_dynamic_engaged_publics/.
 
Baumann, Michael G. (2006, Oct.). “Review of the Increases in Non-Entertainment Programming Provided in Markets with Newspaper Owned Television Stations”: An Update(submitted by Media General, Inc. to the FCC’s 2006 Quadrennial Review of Media Ownership Rules – MB Docket No. 06-121). Available at http://webapp01.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=6518534505 (p. 145).
 
Berkowitz, Dan (2007, Oct.). Professional views, community news: Investigative reporting in small US dailies. Journalism, 8(5), 551-558. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1464884907081051.
 
Borrell, Gordon (2009, Aug. 6). The Rumors of Newspapers' Death (Borrell Associates Report). Available at http://www.borrellassociates.com/wordpress/2009/08/06/the-rumors-of-newspapers-death/.
 
Bystrom, Dianne G., & Dimitrova, Daniela V. (2007, Mar.). Rocking the Youth Vote:  How Television Covered Young Voters and Issues in a 2004 Target State. American Behavioral Scientist, 50(9), 1124-1136. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0002764207299363.


 

Champlin, Dell, & Knoedler, Janet (2002). Operating in the Public Interest or in Pursuit of Private Profits? News in the Age of Media Consolidation. Journal of Economic Issues, 36(2). Available at http://diglib.lib.utk.edu/utj/jei/36/jei-36-2-24.pdf.
 
Chipty, Tasneem (2007, June 24). Station Ownership and Programming in Radio (Media Ownership Research Study 5). Available at http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-07-3470A6.pdf. (Study commissioned by FCC for FCC’s 2006 Quadrennial Review of Media Ownership Rules.)
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Posted in Ideas and Debates Research and Studies
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New Study from Pew Internet & American Life Project

Posted March 2nd, 2010 by Christopher Clark - Special Assistant to the Future of Media project

Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has released an interesting study about online news consumption.  Currently, more people get their news from the Internet than from any other medium, other than TV.  Some of the news and information most commonly sought online include weather forecasts, national news, information about health/medicine, and business/financial news.  When seeking out these (and other) types of information, most Americans (92%) utilize multiple platforms (e.g., national TV, local TV, Internet, national newspapers, local newspapers, radio) in a typical day. Those who use the web tend to visit only a few news sites regularly, and a significant percentage of online news consumers value portability, the opportunity to participate in creating news, and the ability to customize the news content that they receive. Social networking websites such as Facebook and Twitter play a significant role in news dissemination. Check out the study for yourself and view the press release here.

Posted in Research and Studies Internet and Mobile
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Do More Media Choices Translate to More Polarized Elections?

Posted February 17th, 2010 by Irene Wu

In his book, Post-broadcast democracy: how media choice increases inequality in political involvement and polarizes elections (Cambridge, 2007), Markus Prior shows the following graphs. To simplify, he argues when people with little interest in public affairs lived in an environment with few media choices, they were more likely to hear the headlines – for example, catching a news reel while at the movies. With more media choices – cable and satellite television and the Internet – catching the news as a by-product of other activities declines. In other words, more Americans watched the news when there was little else to watch. Fast forward to today, this means that with more media, citizens who are not interested in politics live in an increasingly separate world those who are – thus elections and political involvement are more polarized. What do you think?

Posted in Ideas and Debates Research and Studies Information Needs of Communities
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